Tuesday, 13 May 2014

Issue of Defamation on Google

Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer)

In his campaign to attack all critics of Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011) and himself, Gerald Joe Moreno proved nothing except that the role of a cyberstalking sectarian apologist is acutely misleading and reprehensibly libellous. 

In January 2009, a lawyer passed verdict on the internet attacks by Gerald Joe Moreno (alias Equalizer) in my direction:
“I think that [Gerald] Joe Moreno has been quite defamatory, and I would be very surprised if he has not taken the precaution of ensuring that no property of any value is in his own name, and thus not available to execute against action exerted to satisfy an award of Damages for Defamation. His web writing comes across to me as that of a petty and fanatical lout who always needs to have the last word, and that in itself makes me wonder about his motivation and, thus, to doubt his good faith and his credibility. His output realistically amounts to little more than a hopefully face-saving smokescreen for the benefit of his own cheer squad.” 
The count against Moreno increased substantially by 2010. From 2007, he ignored my detailed protests at his misrepresentation and libel. He was reported to have suffered decease in 2010, although his web output has remained visible on Google. 

Hostile and misleading representations of the present writer have been sustained at diverse Moreno sites and blogs. Those incursions have included the blog called sathyasaibaba.wordpress, in relation to which Moreno misleadingly referred to himself as “sathyasaibaba,” thus creating the misleading impression that his guru Sathya Sai Baba was here the voice of authority.

In more general terms, the collective toll of Moreno victims aroused the verdict of lawyers, in three different countries, that the web attacks of Gerald Joe Moreno were markedly libellous. His output remains a warning of what sectarian zeal can do in the furtherance of "hate campaign," treating any kind of criticism as a punishable offence.

This situation has served to illustrate the extent of abuse which can occur on Google, along with the satellites blogspot and wordpress, a largely unmonitored field with no due regulations in force. 

A pertinent question exists as to the status and propriety of blog defamation surviving on blogspot and wordpress after the decease of a malpractitioner, and in the face of active complaint.
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd 
 
ENTRY no. 27 
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, 2 May 2014

Sectarian Internet Terrorism

Gerald Joe Moreno and Sathya Sai Baba

Gerald Joe Moreno was constantly trying to ridicule all critics of himself and his guru Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011). The many allegations of abuse made against Sathya Sai caused Moreno (alias Equalizer) to become increasingly extremist in his web attacks. He gained the reputation of a cyberstalker and an internet terrorist.

A further blog trespass of Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer) misrepresents the final chapter in my book Pointed Observations (2005). In December 2009, his tactic of defamation again emphasised that  Kevin R. D. Shepherd  was not an academic. Neither Moreno nor myself had academic roles. He attacked both academics and non-academics. Moreno was not an author but a blogger.  His abusive approach referred to my “disappointing personal data.” 
 
The pro-Sai campaigner described me as  “a self-serving and duplicitous critic” in stating I am not an academic; he alleged that I criticised other people because of their lack of credentials. This acute misinterpretation requires correction here.
 
Written in a different style to the rest of the book, the final chapter of Pointed Observations (pp. 343ff.) was entitled Citizen Initiative. This freestyle chapter addressed certain public issues in a direct manner. The problems in contention included the drugs lobby, GM technology, and “new age” alternativism in popular publishing. 
“The strategy in some New Age books is to have a Ph.D eulogy slyly placed on the paperback cover, intended as a proof to consumers that the contents are thoroughly and legitimately consumable" (Pointed Observations, p. 349). 
Some of the endorsements have been considered very misleading. Serious accidents have occurred in consumer sectors.
 
In my hardback book, dispensing with the customary promotionalism so often found in the “alternative” vogues, I expressed my own standing in deliberately low profile terms, to prove that I was not claiming high honours. The unadorned author data was stated in the text, as a demeaning cameo in contrast to the exalted credentials of academic drug advocates like Stanislav Grof, occultists like Paul Brunton (who controversially claimed a doctoral insignia), and diverse "workshop" entrepreneurs like William Bloom:
"People often do look at the author data to be convinced of a scintillating career with due status honours. Do not buy this book, therefore, as you will be disappointed on that account. The author data can be given here instead of being placed enticingly on the opening page or back cover. In an attempt to beat the obituary, here it is: Born a Brit in 1950. Left school at the age of fifteen. Lived in the town ghetto at Cambridge. Entered Cambridge University Library in 1981 as an unpaid and entirely unofficial researcher. Became an upholder of citizen initiative. Has written a number of minor books, none of them official, and only some of them having achieved publication (the missing books have never been seen by any publisher). Is getting old now, but still alive in 2003" (Pointed Observations, p. 351).
It was agreed elsewhere, in responsible circles, that I had not claimed any status or notability, unlike some or many of the ideological rivals. Yet Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer) chose to present this statement entirely out of context, and furthermore acutely misrepresented me in terms of:
“Shepherd castigated numerous people because of their lack of academic credentials (a well known tactic of his against various proponents of the Findhorn Foundation). Kevin R. D. Shepherd even said he would dismiss the PhD or M.D. status of anyone who holds New Age beliefs and boasted ‘The credential of M.D. can signify Mind Damage’. Kevin Shepherd even criticised the research and associations of MIT, Harvard, Oxford and Cambridge Universities” (Equalizer blog accessed 29/12/2009). 
This bizarre version of the book under discussion tends very much to confirm widespread conclusions that pro-sectarian commentaries are extremely unreliable. Moreno here again confirmed his pronounced out-of-context reporting.
 
My book does not contain any castigation of academic credentials or the lack of these. There is instead a critical reference to the habit of some new age publishers to promote controversial books with the academic credentials of enthusiastic reviewers on the cover (a factor resented by traditional academe, with whom I am in agreement). I have not criticised the Findhorn Foundation for lacking academic credentials, but for other matters, including an absence of medical credentials in those personnel opting to promote an officially hazardous alternative therapy (hyperventilation) opposed by Edinburgh University.

Professor Anthony Busuttil

The Moreno duplicity above-cited fails to mention earlier chapters in the same book, where I mention that the Holotropic Breathwork team of the Findhorn Foundation promoted the controversial therapy without any medical credentials (Pointed Observations, pp. 175, 196), and in defiance of the official negative recommendation from the Scottish Charities Office, who commissioned a report from Edinburgh University in 1993. I became noted for supporting the views of Regius Professor Anthony Busuttil, a forensic pathologist (Edinburgh University Pathology Department), both in print (Pointed Observations, pp. 198-99, 387-88) and on the internet (my Citizen Initiative website, 2007, relaying epistolary material including letters to Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator).
 
Moreno typically ignored the relevant web complaint in my Postscript: Further Proof of Internet Terrorism (Oct. 2009), where the matter of his misrepresentation was specified. His acutely misleading mode of attack was not justified by his saisathyasai  role as a “guru defender.”
 
As is well known, my criticisms of the Findhorn Foundation do not relate to a lack of academic credentials, but instead to the acute suppression of dissidents, to promotion of the officially disapproved Grof exercise known as Holotropic Breathwork, and to the juxtaposition of UN ecology with commercial "workshops" in pop-mysticism and alternative therapy. See, e.g., Myth and Reality (2007),  Kate Thomas and the Findhorn Foundation (2009), Commercial Mysticism (2008), and Complaint to David Lorimer
 
Harvard are fleetingly mentioned in earlier chapters of the same book Pointed Observations (see the index) in relation to the controversial episodes of Timothy Leary and Ira Einhorn, whom many academics lament for being Harvard affiliates. Einhorn was a murderer who tried to hide behind his Harvard facade. "He was also a lecturer at Harvard, and this academic veneer of propriety likewise served to shield him" (Pointed Observations, p. 127).
 
As for MIT and the two British universities, the relevant citation is: “Even Cambridge and Oxford are rumoured to be under pressure from big business to modernise and to make a much stronger commitment to technology. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is well funded, but conceivably lacks the perfect philosophy to face the ecological problems so strenuously denied and camouflaged in some areas” (Pointed Observations, p. 350).
 
On an earlier page, I praised MIT for having “contributed to an open-ended project that was prematurely dismissed” (ibid, p. 324), meaning the Club of Rome manifesto.
 
The brief reference to mind damage in association with the M.D. credential is found in an earlier chapter, and relates to the very controversial activities of Dr. Rick Strassman (an M.D. and psychiatrist at the University of New Mexico) who “injected DMT more than 400 times into sixty volunteers” (ibid., p. 158). Some of the victims were in a state of terror, and nearly half of them experienced strong hallucinations of the severe type for which the powerful drug DMT is notorious. Many orthodox medics and psychiatrists, in different countries, felt this to be a lunatic procedure at the time, capable of seriously affecting mental balance. Therefore I commented: “The credential of M.D. can signify Mind Damage” (ibid.). 
 
The vindictively misleading commentary of Gerald Joe Moreno on such matters is surely proof of a lack of scruple and inattention to detail. His manic campaign against all critics, both  of his guru and himself, is no proof whatever that complaints are wrong. 
 
The attack blog of Moreno was entitled Kevin R. D. Shepherd’s Disappointing Personal Data, was dated 25/12/2009, and bore his cult name of Equalizer at blogspot.com. This misleading item was duplicated at geraldjoemoreno.wordpress, though here showing the superficial title of Kevin R. D. Shepherd Left School At 15 But Thinks He's A Scholar. I think of myself as a writer and citizen philosopher, as I have clearly stated. Further, a school-leaving age is no guide to subsequent long-term research on academic premises (Cambridge University Library in my case).
 
The intention of mockery failed in many directions; some critical observers said that Gerald Joe Moreno here confirmed his role as a pro-sectarian cyberstalker with an abusive and defamatory blog agenda.
 
The attack blog in his own name at wordpress dates to the end of 2009. Moreno there declares himself to be a "professional artist" (accessed 08/02/2010). This assertive phrase has been considered objectionable, in view of his attempt to deny the validity of my library research that does not claim professional honours. Gerald Joe Moreno did not write any books, and had no academic or library research history.
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd
 
ENTRY no. 26
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, 20 April 2014

Wikipedia Slap from Gerald Joe Moreno



At the end of 2009, Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer) became a virtual participant in the events of Wikipedia that resulted in deletion of the Kevin RD Shepherd article. According to Wikipedia editor Simon Kidd, Moreno was paying very close attention to that deletion, and was influential amongst the deletionists. As Kidd was the only real name editor involved in that situation, his testimony has to be taken seriously.
 
Moreno certainly did devote prime blogger attention to the Wikipedia deletion, in his capacity as a cyberstalker and apologist for  Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011).  He produced an extremely distorted and unreliable version of that deletionist event, which he entitled “Wikipedia Slaps Kevin R. D. Shepherd on the Face.” More to the point, the slap involved a convergence (or coalition) of cult sympathisers, one of whom went to the extreme of making links to Moreno blogs on the deletion page. That belligerent entity was Dazedbythebell, strongly implicated as a devotee of Meher Babaand part of a devotee circle active on Wikipedia.
 
Dazed wrongly insinuated that I was the Wikipedia editor Alex Jamieson, who produced the article about myself. Dazed also cited a lengthy passage from Moreno polemic as proof that I was unreliable. This passage included Moreno’s rather suspect email conversation with an obscure Mrs. Barringer at the University of Sheffield. She had not heard of my books, and so they could be dismissed by Moreno (Amazon and other big-time purveyors did not figure in such weighted calculations). 
 
A serious anomaly was observed by critics of these events. Moreno had been banned indefinitely from Wikipedia in 2007, on the charge of activist editing. Now his blog defamations were championed by another religious movement active in America, and centred at Myrtle Beach. Worse still perhaps, closely informed observers were convinced that Moreno personally conducted a web mission, in the guise of a new editor, to sabotage a Wikipedia link to my article on the Sai Baba movement.
 
The reason for this special mission was the critical inclusion of Moreno in the final section of that online article. The extremely aggressive new editor (WikiUserTalk) was successful in his objective of eliminating the electronic link. He also tried to impede editor Simon Kidd (another target of Moreno), but was unsuccessful in that direction. Nevertheless, close observers were appalled at the fact that it was so easy for the interloper to be even partially successful. The reason for this success was the extensive pseudonymous activity on Wikipedia, serving to mask sectarian schemes and to assist pro-sectarian personnel in their undeclared campaigns.
 
Two years later,  a concession was made in my direction. Coming to terms with the nature of events was not easy for the Wikipedia management, but Jimmy Wales made some private admissions about the very unpredictable nature of the editorship. In 2012 he personally deleted the SSS108 User page of 2006, a creation of Gerald Joe Moreno which had proved influential. That page was entitled User:SSS108/Kevin Shepherd.
 
The SSS108 (Moreno) User page of 2006 included a collaboration with Jossi Fresco, the “cult” promoter who gained notoriety even within the relatively indulgent ranks of Wikipedia editors and administrators. Here was the origin of the myth about “New Media Books Ltd,” a publisher who did not actually exist but of whom I was supposedly the incarnation. Here also was the story of redoubtable Mrs. Barringer, a putative book expert who was unable to decode the globally relevant listings of such book trade giants as Amazon and Nielsen Bookdata.
 
Above all, that User page featured the drama of Gerald Joe Moreno versus Andries (Kruger Dagneaux), two Wikipedia editors in collision over Sathya Sai Baba. This scenario involved the Moreno snub of an editorial quote concerning the infamous bedroom murders at Puttaparthi ashram, now one of the most notorious sectarian occurrences of the 1990s. This event was too controversial to be acknowledged by supporters of Sathya Sai Baba, and so it was erased from Wikipedia (by Moreno and Jossi Fresco), and all my books with it, due to the recognition in an appendice of one book that this dire event occurred. The stigmatised  book was Investigating the Sai Baba Movement (2005). 
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd
 
ENTRY no. 25
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, 9 April 2014

Marianne Warren and Shirdi Sai Baba



In the attempt to cement his position against what seemed a growing support for myself, Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer) resorted to cheating; he supplied a misleading version of commentary relating to an academic book. A 2009 blog of his bore the title of  Marianne Warren PhD Criticised Kevin RD Shepherd. This attack blog was flawed by a typically obsessive mindset, even using once more an out of context and obsolete quote (from my first website) about which I had complained in 2007. This kind of deceptive presentation can be described as entirely lacking in scruple.
 
The late Dr. Marianne Warren (d. 2004) authored a book on Shirdi Sai Baba,  namely Unravelling the Enigma (1999). Moreno chose to emphasise brief criticisms she had expressed about an early book of mine, while relegating her acknowledgement of discoveries I had made. He wrote as though I had not mentioned the Warren criticisms, and could thus be accused of dishonesty. Moreno cited a single brief comment from one of my web articles. He followed this up with the assertion that:
"Kevin Shepherd omitted Marianne Warren's criticism about him and only snipped out those sections that suited his big ego."
This is a violation of fair comment, and reveals a polemical agenda that is extremely misleading. 



The Moreno commentary exhibits a total  ignorance of what I wrote at some length elsewhere, including my web article that same year on Shirdi Sai Baba (especially note 43). In my book Investigating the Sai Baba Movement (2005), I gave much space in text and annotations to Dr. Warren’s version of Shirdi Sai Baba, covering both the areas of agreement and disagreement between her and myself. That book (page 320) has a total of 25 index references to Dr. Warren, all of these being omitted by Moreno. 

Moreno (SSS108)  had even tried to ban the same book from Wikipedia because it favourably mentioned his opponent Robert Priddy, a leading critic of Sathya Sai Baba. Moreno had not read this book and was entirely unconcerned with the major part of the content, which he consigned to oblivion in 2006 via a Wikipedia User page.  

Warren's main criticism related to references I made to the Indian commentator B. V. Narasimhaswami. The context of those criticisms actually originated with Meher Baba; in this respect, Dr. Warren was at a disadvantage, being unable to locate a certain Indian periodical which included a diary of pressing relevance. I had cited that periodical in my annotations to Gurus Rediscovered (1986), a book which followed an academic practice of placing in the notes the publication data of works cited, thus avoiding the need of a separate bibliography. Dr. Warren commented myopically that there was no bibliography, and was concerned to emphasise her pre-eminence in Marathi. The diary that she ignored was in English. 
 
In my later book, I cited from the first edition of Warren's Unravelling the Enigma: Shirdi Sai Baba in the Light of Sufism (1999). Dr. Warren was then a devotee of Sathya Sai Baba, who claimed to be a reincarnation of Shirdi Sai and to be a miracleworker. Some of her controversial beliefs in that direction were represented in her book (and viewed critically by many other Indologists).
 
Moreno (Equalizer) ignored the contents of my 300-page book. He also completely ignored the fact that Dr. Warren had been influenced by her partisan approach to Sathya Sai Baba, whom she had rejected shortly after her book was published. Dr. Warren had become an ex-devotee, horrified at the allegations of sexual abuse which became well known at circa 2000, and via such critical reports as The Findings of David Bailey.
 
Dr. Warren contributed a revised edition of her book in 2004. She emphasised her new orientation in the revised author's preface, eliminating glorifying references to Sathya Sai Baba and instead making critical comments such as: "From an early age he [Sathya Sai] chose to ride the coat-tails of the Maharashtrian sage [Shirdi Sai], linking his name with that of the earlier Sai Baba in numerous speeches he gave in the 1940s and 1950s, and by taking the name 'Sai,' affixing it to his own name of Sathya."

Dr. Warren intended to go much further in a denunciation of Sathya Sai. She planned to write another book in this context, and the introduction survives. Her death prevented new accomplishments.
 
The Equalizer (Moreno) "hate campaign" strategy of omitted details is not to be recommended. The cult attitude distorts history and commentary, and is a hopeless guide to both. 
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd
 
ENTRY no. 24
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, 2 April 2014

Wikipedia Editor Alex Jamieson

Stephen J. Castro

The cyberstalker tactic of Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer) encompassed Alex Jamieson, who contributed a Wikipedia article about the present writer in late 2009. The superficial Moreno commentary on Jamieson described him as a “Kevin Shepherd devotee,” which is impossible in this instance.
 
Jamieson was the pseudonym for Stephen J. Castro, a civil servant and science enthusiast who had argued with me in private years before, not accepting some of my views. I had not seen him for several years, and to date have not met him for ten years. He had been reading works by and about the neuroscientist Roger Sperry (1913-1994). Castro now credited a convergence of that material with one of my books (Meaning in Anthropos), which he considered to be unusual, and was accordingly well disposed to my output as a whole, which he had read.
 
Castro had little patience with the “new age and guru” scene, was not a follower of anyone, and had written a critical book on the Foundation Foundation, being an ex-member of that body. Moreno had wrongly interpreted this book as one of my own publications, but in fact Castro himself published Hypocrisy and Dissent within the Findhorn Foundation (1996), and in the face of suppression by the Foundation management and staff. He was applauded by ICSA (International Cultic Studies Association), the prestigious American project of academic relevance. See Cultic Studies Journal (1996) 13(2):212ff.
 
Moreno (Equalizer) was clearly antagonistic to Jamieson because he supported me on Wikipedia. The misinterpreter went to the extreme of calling Jamieson (Castro) an “internet hit man and internet terrorist.” This was a retaliation against my own use of those phrases in relation to Moreno (phrases credited by many readers as accurate). 

Some informed readers were astounded to find Moreno asserting that I had called him an internet terrorist "simply because Moreno's webpages are indexed on search engines." This typical third person reference does not absolve the blogger from all responsibility. I had complained at the nature and content of his webpages and attack blogs, which gained a strong degree of salience on Google. See my article Internet Terrorist.

In a similar vein, and on this same blog, Moreno (Equalizer) deceptively stated that I had attacked him "simply because Moreno [third person]  succeeded in getting a reference to Shepherd's self-published material removed from the Sathya Sai Baba Wikipedia article." What he had actually done in 2006 was to post a User page on Wikipedia/Google which effectively denied the legitimacy of my entire output, and in acute reaction to reports by Sathya Sai ex-devotees that were included at the end of one book. The Moreno phrase "simply because" is thoroughly unreliable.

The diverting phraseology occurred at the Moreno website under the formidable heading of: Exposing Critic's Smear Campaigns Against Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba. This was the well known credo of saisathyasai.com. In my case, much of the argument had little to do with the guru.
 
Moreno resented Jamieson because he had incorporated reference to Moreno blog excesses in his article about myself; a Wikipedia administrator deleted the Criticism section of that article. The context is not clear; the Moreno commentary is the source. Moreno was evidently familiar with the occurrence, and apparently complained to the Wikipedia administration. His blog avoids stating the content of the deleted section, which remains valid, especially in view of the fact that his agitating SSS108 User page of 2006 was later deleted from Wikipedia by Jimmy Wales.

Contrary to the Moreno insinuation, Jamieson (Castro) did not need my permission to insert the Criticism section in his article, as he himself felt strongly on this issue. I did grant him permission to use my photograph, as he made a point of requesting this, although he misunderstood about copyright. Jamieson correctly stated that he was new to Wikipedia, which Moreno was prepared to question on the basis of his computer skill, and even confusing him with Jedermann (Dr. M. E. Dean). Castro had acquired IT certification. 
 
Gerald Joe Moreno was now developing a strong habit of inverting accusations made against his overbearing and bludgeoning dismissals. For instance, he stated in the same Equalizer blog about Jamieson: “Moreno [third person] defended himself with factual information against Shepherd’s numerous misrepresentations, shabby research and outright prevarications.” This basically represented a hijacking of my own earlier complaint about Moreno, who had dismissed my published output and misrepresented my role. 
 
The pro-sectarian apologist was frequently noticed to copy words he found used by opponents, including myself. Moreno apparently copied the word rhetoric from me. He overworked this word in some of his blogs. In this way, the anti-Jamieson blog bore the assertion that “all writings associated with pseudo-philosopher Kevin R. D. Shepherd are rich in rhetoric, poor in research and propagandistic in nature.” The accuser  had never read my books. Nor does the condemnation match other assessments of my web articles. 
 
The purport of this vehement accusation explicitly boiled down to myself being a supposed “fierce defender and promoter of Psychic Trance Medium Conny Larsson and LSD Advocate Robert Priddy.” In other words, the objectivity of cyberstalker language is strongly in question. My assessment of Priddy did not converge with that of Moreno. The latter continually ignored the context I provided for my reference to Larsson. 
 
Jamieson (Castro) discovered that Wikipedia was afflicted with cult supporters and passive parties who played along with them, the latter sometimes being deceived by the former. He changed to his real name, and composed a distinctive article about Paul Brunton and Meher Baba. However, he soon found that the Meher Baba article on Wikipedia was dominated by exclusivist devotees who disliked outsiders and due critical apparatus. In disgust, Castro exited from the discussion page of that article in 2012, after observing petty animosities and obstructive attitudes which rejected his own composition (later made available online independently). 
 
Moreno stigmatised both Jamieson and myself as pseudo-philosophers. “They obviously have been sipping too much cuckoo juice.” The juice-sippers were accused of thinking they were “paragons of morality and wisdom.” Ex-devotees of Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011) had made a very similar criticism of Moreno. Jamieson (Castro) never identified himself with the word philosopher (he was too science-oriented). I had described myself as a “citizen philosopher,” but had not claimed wisdom or paragon status. The word philosophy currently means a form of analysis, not wisdom or morality. 

The brunt of Moreno’s distaste was revealed in a quotation he delivered at the end of his blog, citing with approval Henry Louis Mencken (d. 1956) as the author:
“Philosophy consists very largely of one philosopher arguing that all others are jackasses. He usually proves it, and I should add that he also usually proves that he is one himself.” 
The dismissal of philosophy by Moreno (Equalizer) is quite pointed. The scenario is that of a sport for jackasses and bibbers of cuckoo juice. Mencken was an American journalist who admired the nihilistic European philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Mencken relativism was now championed by American Pro-Sai “guru defender” cyberstalking.
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd
 
ENTRY no. 23
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, 23 March 2014

Attacking All Connections

Simon Kidd

In becoming a target of Equalizer (Gerald Joe Moreno), I discovered that my family and supporters were also derided. The hate campaign was thorough and unrelenting, and reflected a cyberstalker tactic. 
 
In December 2009, Moreno attacked Simon Kidd, an academic in Australia who defended me on Wikipedia against a hostile faction influenced by Moreno blogs and by the 2006 Wikipedia User page of SSS108 (Moreno). Kidd was incongruously mocked by Moreno in his role as a Senior Research Officer in Education Policy at the University of Western Australia. Moreno urged that Kidd could not be taken seriously for supporting me. The academic was even described as an “internet propagandist” in this zealous attack. The truth is that Moreno (alias Equalizer) was the major internet apologist and propagandist for Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011). 
 
Moreno/Equalizer contrived the ridiculous argument that Kidd was desperate to deceive others about my “credentials.” I have never claimed credentials, and Kidd made no such reference. Instead the academic showed ability and scruple in parrying the defamatory content of Moreno blogs. 
 
Simon Kidd had earlier obliged the Holotropic Breathwork (HB) promoters on Wikipedia to acknowledge published criticism instead of suppressing this inconvenience. He had a valid role in such measures because of his early correspondence in relation to the HB issue. In 1994-5, Kidd had corresponded with medical authorities, including Regius Professor Anthony Busuttil of Edinburgh University. Busuttil was very concerned about commercial HB, and in 1993 had been commissioned by the Scottish Charities Office to provide a report on that disputed subject. 
 
Moreno knew nothing about such medical matters, and ignorantly caricatured the subject of HB as though it were a crime to support my views in that direction. He even stated that “Simon Kidd was apparently involved with Kevin Shepherd’s campaigns against Stanislav Grof and Holotropic Breathing.” I did not conduct any campaigns, and have never met Simon Kidd. I mentioned the subject of Grof and HB in a few pages in a lengthy annotated book of 1995 (Minds and Sociocultures Vol. One, pp. 66ff., 945ff.). This notice was nothing like the internet campaigns of Gerald Joe Moreno. Nor the sequel chapter in my Pointed Observations (2005). 
 
I had contributed a web article on Grof therapy and MAPS, and this was considered relevant information by some interested academics. MAPS was a controversial pro-psychedelic project of Grof supporter Rick Doblin. The subject of LSD “psychotherapy” is strongly related to HB, which is itself a potentially hazardous exercise in hyperventilation. Criticism of these trends  is not so reprehensible outside the confinement of Pro-Sai cyberstalker polemic. 
 
If credence is given to Moreno, then Edinburgh University and the Scottish Charities Office count for nothing in stemming the tide of commercial therapy represented by such enterprises as Grof Transpersonal Training Inc. Grof had invented HB, and charged high prices for HB workshops at the Findhorn Foundation and elsewhere. 
 
These complexities were typically avoided by Moreno, who suggested that Simon Kidd was involved in “some sort of collaborated scheming on Wikipedia against Stanislav Grof, Holotropic Breathwork and the Findhorn Foundation.” In reality, Kidd merely appeared on a discussion page to dispute the suppressive HB publicity. Even one of the HB supporters remarked that the Wikipedia article on HB read like a therapy advert until Kidd made objections. 
 
Observers again deduced that Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer) could not be taken seriously in his extremist arguments and defamations. 
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd 
 
ENTRY no. 22 
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, 17 March 2014

Findhorn Foundation



In September 2009, Equalizer produced a blog entry glorifying the Findhorn Foundation. This was evidently intended as a counter to my criticism of that “commercial workshop” organisation. 
 
Speculation was aroused that Equalizer (Gerald Joe Moreno) was an affiliate of the Foundation, as a consequence of the former association of this organisation with Sathya Sai Baba. The activity of “channelling,” under the auspices of Sathya Sai, had been popular in that new age centre. 
 
Critics observed that Moreno’s elevation of the Foundation contradicted his loudspeaker critique of ex-devotee Conny Larsson, whose “workshop” activities were to some extent reminiscent of the Foundation counterpart. Moreno mentioned approvingly such controversial workshop exemplars as Caroline Myss, William Bloom,  Eckhart Tolle, and Neale Donald Walsch. All of these entrepreneurs had made appearances at the Findhorn Foundation, with Myss and Bloom being regular attractions. On the internet, Eckhart Tolle TV is regarded by many critics as another “new age” commercial distraction. 
 
A very different approach to the Foundation can be found in such web articles as Myth and Reality. Workshop commercialism was also repudiated by Stephen J. Castro in his book Hypocrisy and Dissent within the Findhorn Foundation (1996). This work was afflicted with a misleading classification by Moreno, even while academic status ICSA (in America) were recognising the merits of that annotated book as an important statement in the face of questionable new age managerialism (and despite the CIFAL promotionalism).  
 
Moreno had erroneously described the relevant publishing imprint of Hypocrisy and Dissent as my own. The real publisher was Stephen Castro. The latter was not a “vanity publisher,” to use misleading Moreno language. Castro demonstrated considerable courage in publishing his book at Forres, in the close vicinity of the Foundation, who were notorious for their extremist reactions to criticism. The Foundation management had even attempted to place a legal interdict upon a former dissident book, though without success. Democracy is not a feature of the American and European new age. 
 
Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer) was so uninformed about events in Forres that he even rendered the logo of New Media Books as New Media Books Ltd, perhaps wishing to give the impression of capitalist vanities. In actual fact, Castro only published two books under that imprint, and was far from possessing company status. As to the content of those books, it will probably be a long time before the “alternative” society arrives at any due recognition of past events and current critical priorities. 
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd 
 
ENTRY no. 21 
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, 1 March 2014

Copyright Muddle of Gerald Joe Moreno

Images of Kate Thomas (Jean Shepherd) abused by Gerald Joe Moreno. Images copyright Kevin R. D. Shepherd.

In his web campaign to offset all criticism of Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011), Equalizer (Gerald Joe Moreno) proved his talent for confusing argument in what he called the “Copyright Issue.” This was a reductionist ploy of 2009. I was here described in terms of “foamed-at-the-mouth, gnashed his teeth and raised a huge wail about Joe Moreno [note third person] violating his copyrights for duplicating pictures of himself and his mother.” 
 
The accusation was misleading. I had indeed complained about the excessive use of images, three of myself and five of my mother. Equalizer flagrantly reproduced these eight images yet again on the “Copyright Issue” blog page, demonstrating his defiance against reasonable complaint. 
 
Equalizer (Moreno) added that “Shepherd implied he may take legal action against Moreno” for duplicating images. This was incorrect, as my reference to legal action had implied the libellous tactic of Moreno, not image copyrights. Equalizer thus gave the convenient impression that only photographs were at issue. In reality, the extensive train of misinformation, personal attack, family harassment, and other matters were being monitored by legal analysis that had reached very negative conclusions about Gerald Joe Moreno, alias Equalizer.  
 
The cyberstalker then launched into his favoured theme that his sole image was copyright protected, and therefore must not be used by anyone. He had placed five images of my mother with an insulting caption on his attack website, but no image of Moreno could be used by me. The discrepant  nature of this situation was clear to observers.
 
The obnoxious blog was entitled “Kate Thomas aka Jean Shepherd.” The family attack associations were made quite explicit by Equalizer when he presented another of his misrepresentations on that page. The militant guru defender stated that “Jean Shepherd is a widely solicited public figure and critic in regards to the Findhorn Foundation.” He added in brackets “albeit exclusively through her son and self-publisher.”

The word “exclusively” was here rendered in bold, meaning that Moreno discourse was irrefutable on this point. In actual fact, the emphasised word was a fiction.
 
My mother (Kate Thomas) had authored published books (in the plural), none of which were published by me. She was celebrated in numerous press reports of the 1990s, including major British newspapers. She also appeared prominently in an annotated book by Stephen Castro that was not published by me, and which furthermore gained recognition from  ICSA.  The magnitude of error on cult web deserves acknowledgment. 
 
The misleading blogger next opted to describe me as “a self-serving hypocrite.” This charity of Pro-Sai defamation is a testimony to what can happen on the American web to members of other nations. This strike was masked by another banal item of camouflage: a ridiculous reflection that my complaint about images was negated by my own use of images in relation to such people as Eileen Caddy (deceased), Andrew Cohen, Ken Wilber, and Frank Visser. The issue of Moreno libel and distortion was totally bypassed. Caddy was dead, Cohen and Wilber were controversial entities whose images were well known, and Visser had no objection to his image being reproduced by me. 
 
Equalizer concluded with an extremist expression of a type that many readers found unconvincing. I was here called an “internet terrorist” and “sectarian cyberstalker.” The criterion here was that I had “pirated” the sole Moreno image by showing this on my sites. 
 
Critical analysts were easily able to decode the rhetorical devices employed here. I had complained that Moreno was an internet terrorist and sectarian cyberstalker. This met with ready agreement from victims and close analysts of the situation. Yet in Equalizer/Moreno blog justification, this meant that the critic was an internet terrorist and cyberstalker. Tit for tat response.
 
The logical effect of these blogger devices, if taken seriously, would lead to situations such as: anybody complaining of a murder would be labelled a murderer by the criminals. Anybody complaining of a theft would be regarded as a thief by the apologists. Any counter-accusation would be justifiable, because then only blog deception would rule, even if regarded as blogspot.com state of the art. 
 
A secondary consideration here is that pseudonymous trolls lacking a web image may need to be identified in such cases of evasion. 
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd 
 
ENTRY no. 20 
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, 1 February 2014

Conny Larsson and Sathya Sai Baba

Conny Larsson

On a website, I reported an address given by ex-devotee Conny Larsson at a FECRIS conference in 2006. In this relevant talk, Larsson furnished information concerning sexual abuses achieved by his former guru Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011). Equalizer (Gerald Joe Moreno) reacted to my report by accusing me of endorsing Larsson’s “new age” activities. I had not done anything of the sort. 
 
There followed a tiresome spate of Moreno web accusations about my supposed support for Larsson’s fashionable and exotic “workshop” roles. I was obliged to refute this apologist tactic in a new web article. That article described Moreno (Equalizer, SSS108) as an internet terrorist. 
 
The idiosyncratic reasoning of Gerald Joe Moreno preferred to assume that anyone who mentioned what an ex-devotee said was necessarily in agreement with all the thinking and behaviour of the other party. This was a very illogical exercise in attempted stigma, and patently ridiculous. Strongly visible on Google were blog idioms of Equalizer such as “Shepherd’s desperate and shameless justifications and cover-ups for psychic medium Conny Larsson.” All this amounted to an apologist recourse of superficial rhetoric. 

I have never been in contact with Larsson, and merely reported relevant details about which he knew at firsthand. Those details can be encapsulated here by his well known observation that the Puttaparthi ashram of Sathya Sai was the scene of "a paedophile ring." Larsson himself was encouraged by the guru into a homosexual relationship (with Sathya Sai) for four years.

Larsson's book Behind the Mask of the Clown is very revealing. He relates how Sathya Sai sexually molested him in a private interview, but wished him to keep quiet about the new relationship. Larsson eventually discovered that he was not the only one in this predicament; there were many others. The guru even paid sexually exploited students and devotees, evidently desiring their attention at this intimate and secretive level. Larsson even says that the four men who died in the notorious bedroom murders at the Puttaparthi ashram were victims of sexual abuse whom he had known personally (see excerpts).
 
Close analysts remarked that the “Larsson complex” of Moreno served as a distraction from the strong allegations of sexual abuse lodged against Sathya Sai Baba. In trying to divert attention from the numerous allegations of abuse, Moreno invented fantastic scenarios for critics. He described this ruse in terms of “exposing” the critics.

Kevin R. D. Shepherd 
 
ENTRY no. 19 
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, 25 January 2014

Kevin RD Shepherd Not a New Age Promoter

Sathya  Sai  Baba


The Pro-Sai campaign of Gerald Joe Moreno entailed an excessive and blanket denunciation of all critics of Sathya Sai Baba and himself. This activity involved an acute tendency to misrepresent his opponents.

The misleading blogtalk of Gerald Joe Moreno (alias Equalizer) presented me as a “New Age Promoter.” In a 2008 blog bearing this title, I was assailed as “a vanity self-publisher and author whose writings mostly revolve around (or include numerous references to) the Findhorn Foundation, Stanislav Grof and Holotropic Breathing.” 

This judgment reveals an acute misconception or manipulation that is not supported by my writings. Not having read my books, Moreno invented capricious themes of an extremist nature. My first website did frequently mention the Findhorn Foundation (in a critical context), and to a lesser extent Grof, but that factor is no gauge of my output as a whole. 

A related peculiarity was the assertion of Equalizer that “Kevin Shepherd typically references Kate Thomas (aka “Jean Shepherd,” his mother) and Stephen J. Castro in his writings.” Uninformed readers gained the impression that all I wrote about in my books and web articles were my mother and one other writer. The convenience of this contraction for Pro-Sai polemic was considerable, but by no means justified. See further my bibliography of books and web articles

In the same blog, Equalizer arrived at the disputed conclusion that “these verifiable facts leave Kevin Shepherd looking rather pathetic and foolish and reeking of hypocrisy.” This demeaning verdict appeared in the same paragraph as the incessant Moreno theme that I had endorsed the “psychic trance medium Conny Larsson.” I had done no such thing, as inspection of my output will reveal. 

I had merely cited the FECRIS report of ex-devotee Conny Larsson concerning sexual abuse on the part of Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011). In contrast, the Larsson workshop adventures in “psychic trance” and Vedic mantra may well amount to confused ex-devotee activity. Such lapses could hardly be more objectionable than the vituperative polemic of an aggressive blogger like Gerald Joe Moreno. 

Kevin R. D. Shepherd 

ENTRY no. 18 

Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, 10 January 2014

Robert Priddy and VK Narasimhan

V.K. Narasimhan and Robert Priddy, 1994

Gerald Joe Moreno (Equalizer) was a militant supporter of Sathya Sai Baba (d. 2011). He maintained extremist descriptions of ex-devotee Robert Priddy, a retired academic in Norway. Moreno  wrongly presented  Priddy as an LSD advocate. Priddy had taken LSD long before in the 1960s; his own report invalidates the accusation. "My involvement with LSD ended many decades ago." The LSD defamation was spread extensively on the web by the cyberstalker tactics of Moreno, who was taken to task for infringing copyright.
 
Moreno bracketed me with Priddy, and to the extent of creating a blog feature entitled “Kevin Shepherd and Robert Priddy.” I was presented as a virtual accomplice in Anti-Sai crime with the leading Western critic of Sathya Sai Baba. In actual fact, I had never met Priddy, was not an ex-devotee (or devotee), and merely corresponded with him at one period several years ago. I was sympathetic to his substantial dissident data; Priddy was informative to a surprising degree. Yet I did not share his outlook as a whole, which tended to be sceptical in the materialist sense (there is abundant  latitude for scepticism, but this does not have to be materialist in order to possess validity).
 
A Wikipedia article on Priddy cited my book Investigating the Sai Baba Movement (2005), and this development prompted a Moreno campaign in my direction, at first on a Wikipedia User page. When I objected to this treatment, Moreno (SSS108) targeted me at his notorious website. I was even depicted by Moreno as participating with Priddy in a “constant bashing of Sai Devotees as liars.” In reality, I protested against the aggression and manipulation of Moreno, which commenced against me on Wikipedia.
 
Moreno (Equalizer) made elaborate complaints that Priddy had made huge mistakes in his report of V.K. Narasimhan (d. 2000), a devotee of Sathya Sai Baba who lived at the Puttaparthi ashram. The idiom was: “It is entirely possible that Robert Priddy fabricated or embellished information about V.K. Narasimhan to further his venomous campaigns against Sai Baba.” That was one of the more restrained Moreno assertions.
 
When I inspected the relevant materials, it was obvious to me that Moreno was avoiding the crucial point. I expressed this disagreement on my first website, and was treated to a volley of attack strategy that quickly showed on my Google name listing. Moreno asserted that one of his webpages provided “concise and damning information about him [Priddy] that proves he is not credible.” The word proves was here rendered in bold print, part of the blog tactic designed to emphasise Moreno key words as being unassailable.
 
The attack was extended in such phrases as: “Robert Priddy’s attributions to V. K. Narasimhan are subjective and non-verifiable hearsay.” The word subjective was here emphasised. Nobody was supposed to argue with such finality of judgment; to do so was a crime of major proportions and an offence punishable by libellous blog campaign.
 
The Equalizer blog “Kevin Shepherd and V. K. Narasimhan” was typically tyrannical and condemnatory. For example, “Kevin Shepherd’s position about V. K. Narasimhan undermines his self-professed integrity and highlights his bias and unsupported viewpoints.” I had never made a case of professing integrity, but had instead objected to the misrepresentation achieved by Gerald Joe Moreno.
 
Priddy has published online his early diaries dating from the 1990s and earlier, when he was a devotee of Sathya Sai Baba and in personal contact with Narasimhan. These diaries furnish adequate proof of his contentions. Priddy himself was at first puzzled. “My very first discussion with Narasimhan... left me perplexed, because he openly ridiculed those who insisted that Sai Baba was omniscient and omnipotent.” Moreover, Narasimhan “always harboured doubts about Sathya Sai Baba’s extravagant assertions.” Quotes from Narasimhan-Priddy.   
 
Narasimhan was an atypical devotee, formerly a journalist of repute; he is reported to have been deeply critical of varied events and policies relating to his guru Sathya Sai Baba. This instance serves to underline that prohibitive mandates about “what could not have happened” require due caution in the analysis of guru phenomena.
 
Kevin R. D. Shepherd
 
ENTRY no. 17
 
Copyright © 2014 Kevin R. D. Shepherd. All Rights Reserved.